“Shut Up & Sing.” Reflections on the Women’s March 2017

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“Shut Up & Sing.” Reflections on the Women’s March 2017

I posted a photo last night saying I was honored to perform the Women’s March ATX 2017. A fan reacted, “Shut up and Sing! Your politics don’t matter to me.”

Which got me to thinking. . .

ATX MARCHMy music is non-partisan. I sing for the hearts of all. I write songs and sing for people to feel okay being human, messy, experiencing loss, triumph over one’s own inner struggles, connectedness to others and a sense of love. I don’t sway politically in my music. I sing for everyone. I believe that music is medicine for the human heart and that can bring us to grow as individuals, regardless of creed or political belief, tax bracket, race or gender. I sing and write songs for YOU. ALL of you, if I’m lucky enough.

I would like to believe that in these polarized times, that people gathered yesterday around the world marching FOR justice, liberty & peace – to remind one another of our inalienable rights and our individual and unified power to protect and uphold them. Many were marching FOR liberty and peace and not AGAINST any one person who is wearing the contemporary face of oppression. We will always encounter oppressors — the faces will change but our values and rights deserve vigilance no matter who is “in charge.”

Tameca Jones

Photo by Adam Kealing

I was so honored to be a small part of that. I was asked to perform by Melissa Fiero, the organizer and Women Rising who produced a hell of a great event to perform the Austin March, attended by over 50k men, women and children. I was moved by the speeches of women and men from around the world, sharing stories of overcoming, growing, being humbled by life and their journeys, and I was inspired by their insight and perseverance.

I can’t speak for other marches and speakers around the world, but our voices were joined in positive and uplifting song and messages. Wendy Davis shared that at one point, a single mother and afraid of judgment and losing support, she denied being a feminist. She kept growing and has gratitude for the lessons she’s learned. Lloyd Doggett, Texas State representative spoke of his continued desire to listen to the humans around him who may not have as loud a voice as others. Lots of people from different socioeconomic and racial backgrounds spoke and sang together. There were religious leaders representing many faiths in a desire to unify hearts and align them with tending the fires nurturing our common visions of a brighter future and our values to uphold the civil liberties we enjoy now.

Photo by Adam Kealing

Photo by Adam Kealing

It was an honor to perform my songs “Shine” and “Nothin’ Gonna Take My Love” and the cover “True Colors” with my sisters Noelle Hampton and Suzanna Choffel in sweet harmony. It was an honor to play a grand finale with an amazing cast of beautiful people on stage standing firm for their beliefs.  We sang “With A Little Help from my Friends” with Tameca Jones, Gina Chavez and all the beautiful voices of speakers and representative, volunteers and marchers.

Some folks say this “movement” will go the way of the “Occupy” movement. I believe otherwise.

Women have always had and used their power in subtle ways to shift the world. As mothers, teachers and leaders, we mold our worlds on a daily basis. Sure, it’s not as glamorous as our marching in the media but it is impactful.

Gina Chavez

Photo by Adam Kealing

We can align with what keeps earth bountiful and does not poison it further.

We can be mindful with our words and actions.

We can get away from the TV and computer and use our time to serve others.

We can take inventory to see what practices we are doing as individuals to contribute to the destruction of the planet. I certainly could eliminate more plastics from my life, learn how to garden and teach more children music.

Photo by Adam Kealing

Photo by Adam Kealing

While it’s not as press-worthy, we have powerful work to do in the every day as men and women and as citizens of a world that faces injustice, poverty, pollution and cruelty. We have work to do, no matter who is “in charge.”

The largest march across the world in history was a powerful statement to be followed with daily action in large and small ways to continue to nurture our families, communities and hopefully, the world, no matter where we stand politically.

What I loved most about the march yesterday in Austin (I don’t know about other cities) is that the only thing any of the folks could argue about was who was gonna clean up the lawn of The Capitol.

Photo by Kristi Wright

Photo by Kristi Wright

2017-02-09T14:50:49+00:00 January 22nd, 2017|